Georgy Sveshnikov. 2017. Screenshot of the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxVSo7JgGWk

15 October 2022, 23:57

ECtHR awards compensation of 45,000 euros to Sochi resident for torture

The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) has obliged Russian authorities to pay 45,000 euros to Georgy Sveshnikov, a resident of Sochi, as compensation within the case of torturing him by law enforcers.

The "Caucasian Knot" has reported that on March 28, 2018, a court in the Krasnodar Territory rejected two complaints lodged by Sveshnikov, who demanded to make law enforcers accountable, claiming that they had tortured him into confessing to committing a theft. On September 29, 2018, human rights defenders claimed that the refusal to open a criminal case on torturing Sveshnikov violated his rights; they filed a complaint with the ECtHR.

In May 2017, Georgy Sveshnikov stated that law enforcers took him away from the lesson and beat him up while trying to force him to confess to shoplifting. The schoolboy said that after that he spent a week at hospital because of received traumas and bruises.

Let us remind you that on September 16 this year, Russia ceased to be a party to the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR).

This article was originally published on the Russian page of 24/7 Internet agency ‘Caucasian Knot’ on October 15, 2022 at 02:00 pm MSK. To access the full text of the article, click here.

Source: Caucasian Knot

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