19 August 2003, 16:03

Head of Commission on Human Rights supported the Moslems of Karelia

On August 14, 2003 there was a meeting of the Chairman of the Spiritual Administration of Moslems of the Republic of Karelia Mufti Visam Ali Bardvil with the chairman of the Commission on Human Rights in Karelia, the member of the Union of Writers of the republic Marat Tarasov, which was devoted to the events that had taken place on August 2, 3, 4, 2003 in the town of Kondopoga. Then so-called troopers attacked people of non-Slavic appearance working on the markets of the city. Tarasov fully supported and agreed that human rights were grossly violated. Thereupon he promised to contact the appropriate figures at the Kondopoga Chief Department of Internal Affairs and take all necessary measures to prevent such incidents, the press service of the Karelian Spiritual Administration of Moslems reported.

Apart from that, the mufti paid attention of the chairman of the Karelian Commission on Human Rights that is was inadmissible to mention nationalities of the criminals in republican news summaries. In addition, Bardvil called to abandon the cliche ?a person of Caucasian nationality? and give journalists no chance to punctuate the attention on this issue. Mr. Tarasov supported the mufti in this question as well and promised to carry out enlightenment work among the journalists.

Source: Islam.ru Website

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